Posts Tagged ‘quantization’

Summary of Findings So Far

February 5, 2018

I took the time to update the sidebar describing a summary of the unitary twist field theory I’ve been working on.  I also paid to have those horrid ads removed from my site–seems like they have multiplied at an obnoxious rate on WordPress lately.

One problem with blogs describing research is the linear sequence of posts makes it really hard to unravel the whole picture of what I am doing, so I created this summary (scroll down the right-hand entries past the “About Me” to the Unitary Twist Field Theory) .  Obviously it leaves out a huge amount, but should give you a big picture view of this thing and my justification for pursuing it in one easy-to-get place.

The latest:  I discovered that the effort to work out the quark interactions in the theory yielded a pretty exact correlation to the observed masses of the electron, up quark and down quark.  In this theory, quarks and the strong force mediated by gluons is modeled by twist loops that have one or more linked twist loops going through the center.  This twist loop link could be called a pole, and while the twist rotation path is orthogonal to the plane of the twist loop, the twist rotation is parallel and thus will affect the crossproduct momentum that defines the loop curvature.  Electrons are a single loop with no poles, and thus cannot link with up or down quarks.  Up quarks are posited to have one pole, and down quarks have two.  A proton, for example, links two one-pole up quarks to a single two-pole down quark.

The twist loop for an up quark has one pole, a twist loop path going through the center of it.  This pole acts with the effect of a central force relation similar (but definitely is not identical to an electromagnetic force) to a charged particle rotating around a fixed charge source–think an atom nucleus with one electron orbiting around it.  The resulting normal acceleration results from effectively half the radius of the electron loop model, and thus has four times the rotation frequency and thus 4 times the mass of an electron.  The down quark, with two poles, doubles the acceleration yet again, thus giving 8 times the mass of an electron.

It will be no surprise to any of you that this correlates to the known rest masses of the electron, up quark, and down quark:  .511MeV, 2.3MeV, and 4.8MeV.

I can hear you screaming to the rafters–enough with the crackpot numerology!  All right, I hear you–but I liked seeing this correlation anyway, no matter what you all think!

Agemoz

Sim Works for Linear Twists

January 1, 2018

Happy New Year with hope for peace and prosperity for all!

I now have the sim working for one class of particles, the linear twist.  I fixed various problems in the code and now am getting reasonable pictures for both the ring and the linear twist.  Something is still not right on the ring, but the linear twist is definitely stable with one class of test parameters.  This is an important finding because my previous work seemed to be unable to create a model of a photon (linear twist), so I had focused on the ring case.  However, last night (New Year’s Eve, what a great way to start the New Year!) I realized the problem was my assumptions on how to set up the linear twist initial conditions.

Discrete photons are always depicted as a spiral rotation of orthogonal field vectors in a quantized lump.  I could not make my sim do this, both ends of the lump would not dissipate correctly no matter how I set up the initial conditions and test parameters–the clump always eventually disappeared.  I suddenly realized this picture of a photon is not correct–you have to go to the frame of reference of the photon motion to see what’s really going on.  The correct picture in the photon’s frame of reference is not a clump nor a spiral, but simply a column of vectors all in phase from start to finish (emission and absorption).  It’s the moving frame of reference at light speed that makes the photon ends appear to start and stop in transit.  The sim easily simulates the column case indefinitely.  It also should correctly simulate the ring case for the same reason–and in this case since the frame of reference goes around the ring, the spiral nature of the twist becomes apparent in the sim.  It should also create an effective momentum (wants to move in a straight line) to counteract the natural tendency to shrink into non-existence, but I don’t have the correct test parameters that that is happening yet.

One thing that should please some of you–all of you?  🙂   The background state so far is not necessary to produce these results!  That concept was necessary to produce a quantized lump for the linear photon, but as I noted, that’s not how photons work in their frame of reference.  That simplifies the theory–and the sim computation.  And, most importantly as I suggested in the previous post, seems to validate the concept of assuming that a precursor rotation (twist) vector field can form particles.

Agemoz

First Unitary Twist Field Sim Output–It’s a Three Ring Circus! (Update)

December 24, 2017

UPDATE:  errors in the sim calculations are distorting the expected output–it’s too early to make any conclusions yet.  Corrected results coming soon–the CUDA calculations work in 3D blocks over the image, including overlap borders.  As you might expect, the 4D computation gets complex when accounting for the overlap elements.  I had the blocks overlapping incorrectly, which left holes in the computation that caused the soliton image to be substantially distorted.  I still see strong indications that there will be stable solitons in the results, but need to correct a variety of issues in the sim before drawing any conclusions.  Stay tuned…

The first results from the Unitary Twist Field Theory are in, and they are showing a three ring circus! Here are the sim output pictures. The exciting news is that the field does produce a stable particle configuration that is very independent of the initial boundary conditions and strength of the background state and the neighborhood connection force–the same particle emerges from a wide variety of startup configurations. Convergence appears visible after about 20 iterations, and remains stable and unchanging after 200000 steps. So–no question that this non-linear field produces stable solitons, thus validating my hypothesis that there ought to be some field that can produce the particle zoo. Will this particular field survive investigation into relativistic behavior, quantum mechanics and produce the diversity of particles we see in the real world? I created this theory based on the E=hv constraint that implies a magnitude-free field and a background state, a rotation vector field that includes the +/-I direction, and many other things discussed in previous posts, so I think this field is a really good guess. However, it wouldn’t surprise me at all that I don’t have this right and that changes to the hypothetical field will be necessary.  As usual, as in any new line of research work, it’s quite possible I’m doing something stupid or this is the result of some artifact of how I am doing the simulation–it doesn’t look like it to me, but that’s always something to watch out for.  However, here I am seeing good evidence I have validated this line of inquiry–looking for a non-linear precursor field that produces the particles and force-exchange particles of the Standard Model.

It’s very hard to visualize even with the 4D to 2D projected slices I show here. I color coded the +I (background state) dimension as red, -I direction as black, and combined all three real dimensions to blue-green. Note there is no magnitude in a unitary twist field (mathematicians probably would prefer I call this a R3+I rotation unitary vector field), so intensity here simply indicates the angular proximity to the basis vector (Rx, Ry, Rz, or +/-I). For now, you’ll have to imagine these images all stacked on top of each other, but I’ll see if I can get clever with Mathematica to process the output in a 3D plot.

Studying these pictures shows a composite structure of two parallel R3 rings and an orthogonal interlocking -I ring, and something I can’t quite identify, kind of a bridge in the center between the two rings, from these images. These pictures are the 200000 step outputs.  You can ignore the image circles cursors in some of the screen capture shots, I should have removed those!

More investigation results to come, stay tuned!

Agemoz

Unitary Twist Field Sim Update

December 3, 2017

I have been developing and refining CUDA code that runs a simulation of the Unitary Twist Field theory. This theory essentially says that all particles and exchange particles have an underlying “precursor” field. Put another way, I’m positing that U(1) x SU(2) x SU(3) will emerge from a single unitary rotation field in R3 + I. The proposed field is non-linear because it also has a background state rotation vector potential. This quantizes twists in the field, and provides a mechanism for twist propagation to curve, thus enabling closed loop twists. The work on the simulation is designed to allow observation of the behavior of such a field in a variety of boundary condition situations.

This work is very much in its infancy, but has already yielded some very interesting insights. The crucial question I want to answer at this point is whether this field can yield stable closed loop twists. The background state potential is crucial for distinguishing this theory from any that are based on linear equations such as Maxwell’s field equations. The background state concept emerged from the need to quantize field behavior geometrically via unit twists in the field. Conceptualizing the behavior of a rotation space in two or even three dimensions appears to show that it should be possible to create stable solitons, but is this true in four dimensions over time–the R3 of our existence plus the +/- I dimension needed for the background state orientation.

I have been working hard to work out the rules for the R3 + I field, but four dimensions is very hard to visualize and work out a geometry of theorems. The simulation environment is designed to assist with this effort.

The sim work has already exposed some pretty critical understanding of what a twist ring would look like. I had originally envisioned a ring of twisting vectors surrounded by the background rotation state +I. However, it turns out things are a lot more complicated than that. If the twisting vectors are in R3 and not in I (the current hypothesis for the simplest closed loop particle), this cannot be stable unless the center of the ring is pointing to -I. The surprising result was that both the +I and -I are stable states when a +I potential is applied! By itself, the -I state would be metastable but any neighborhood connection would make both +I and -I stable–in 2 dimensions and possibly in 3 dimensions–still thinking through the latter case. But the theory requires 4 dimensions, is the ring stable in that case? My mind cannot swallow the 4 dimensional case, but the sim work showed some fascinating elaboration of the R3 + I case.

The -I center must be surrounded by a shell of real (R3) rotations (see illustration below). There must be a transition from +I to R3 to -I and back again, but in all dimensions of R3. There is only one possible way to create a surface of contiguous R3 vectors. I was able to rule out the normal vectors on the surface, because there appears to be no way to transition contiguously to +I or internally to -I without creating a discontinuity. But a surface of tangental vectors would work, provided that the tangental vectors at the equator of the sphere point in the same circumerential (eg, x-y) direction, gradually pointing up to the normal direction, which would be -I at the center, +/- Z at the poles of the surface, and +I outside of the surface. In essence, this work is showing there is only one possible way to form a ring and it actually is enclosing the -I center with a surface of real vectors. Essentially the ring looks like a complementary pair of vortexes with the ring being the common top of the vortexes. It should be possible to create more complex structures with multiple -I poles, but right now the important question is this: is this construct stable. I’m hoping that the sim will verify if this rotation vector model of the ring dissipates in some way. I can envision that the -I core cannot unwind, that it is locked and stable, but it is really hard to prove that in my mind in four dimensions. The sim should show it, I’ll keep you posted.

Agemoz

CP Parity in the Unitary Twist Field

July 31, 2017

In the last post, I showed how the unitary twist field theory enables a schematic method of describing quark combinations, and how it resolved that protons are stable but free neutrons are not. I thought this was fascinating and proceeded to work out solutions for other quark combinations such as the neutral Kaon decay, which you will recognize as the famous particle set that led to the discovery of charge parity violation in the weak force. My hope was to discover the equivalent schematic model for the strange quark, which combined with an up or down quark gives the quark structure for Kaons. That work is underway, but thinking about CP Parity violation made me realize something uniquely important about the Unitary Twist Field Theory approach.

CP Parity violation is a leading contender for an explanation why the universe appears to have vastly more matter than antimatter. Many theories extend the standard model (in the hopes of reconciling quantum effects with gravity). Various multi-dimensional theories and string theory approaches have been proposed, but my understanding of these indicates to me that no direct physical or geometrical explanation for CP Parity violation is built in to any of these theories. I recall one physicist writing that any new theory or extension of the standard model had better have a rock-solid basis for CP Parity violation, why CP symmetry gets broken in our universe, otherwise the theory would be worthless.

The Unitary Twist Field does have CP Parity violation built in to it in a very obvious geometric way. The theory is based on a unitary directional field in R3 with orientations possible also to I that is normal to R3. To achieve geometric quantization, twists in this field have a restoring force to +I. This restoring force ensures that twists in the field either complete integer full rotations and thus are stable in time (partial twists will fall back to the background state I direction and vanish in time).

But this background state I means that this field cannot be symmetric, you cannot have particles or antiparticles that orient to -I!! Only one background state is possible, and this builds in an asymmetry to the theory. As I try to elucidate the strange quark structure from known experimental Kaon decay processes, it immediately struck me that because the I poles set a preferred handedness to the loop combinations, and that -I states are not possible if quantization of particles is to occur–this theory has to have an intrinsic handedness preference. CP Parity violation will fall out of this theory in a very obvious geometric way. If there was ever any hope of convincing a physicist to look at my approach, or actually more important, if there was any hope of truth in the unitary twist field theory, it’s the derivation of quantization of the particle zoo and the explanation for why CP Parity violation happens in quark decay sequences.

Agemoz

Special Relativity and Unitary Twist Field Theory–Addendum

February 2, 2017

If you read my last post on the special relativity connection to this unitary twist field idea, you would be forgiven for thinking I’m still stuck in classical physics thinking, a common complaint for beginning physics students. But the importance of this revelation is more than that because it applies to *any* curve in R3–in particular, it shows that the composite paths of QFT (path integral paradigm) will behave this way as long as they are closed loops, and so will wave functions such as found in Schrodinger’s wave equation. In the latter case, even a electron model as a cloud will geometrically derive the Lorentz transforms. I believe that what this simple discovery does show is that anything that obeys special relativity must be a closed loop, even the supposedly point particle electron. Add in the quantized mass/charge of every single electron, and now you have the closed loop field twists to a background state of the unitary field twist theory that attempts to show how the particle zoo could emerge.

Agemoz

Special Relativity and Unitary Twist Theory

January 30, 2017

I’ve been working diligently on the details of how the quantizing behavior of a unitary twist vector field would form loops and other topological structures underlying a particle zoo. It has been a long time since I’ve talked about its implications for special relativity and the possibilities for deriving gravity, but it was actually the discovery of how the theory geometrically derives the time and space dilation factor that convinced me to push forward in spite of overwhelming hurdles to convincing others about the unitary twist theory approach.

In fact, I wrote to several physicists and journals because to me the special relativity connection was as close as I could come to a proof that the idea was right. But here I discovered just how hard it is to sway the scientific community, and this became my first lesson in becoming a “real” scientist. Speculative new theories occupy a tiny corner in the practical lives of scientists, I think–the reality is much reading and writing, much step-by-step incremental work, and journals are extremely resistant to accept articles that might cause embarrassment such as the cold-fusion fiasco.

Back in my formative days for physics, sci.physics was the junk physics newsgroup and sci.physics.research was the real deal, a moderated newsgroup where you could ask questions and get a number of high level academic and research scientists to respond. Dr. John Baez of UC Riverside was probably one of the more famous participants–he should be for his book “Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity”, which is one of the more accessible texts on some of the knowledge and thinking leading to thinking about gravity. But on this newsgroup he was the creator of the Crackpot Index, and this more than anything else corrected my happy over-enthusiasm for new speculative thinking. It should be required reading for anyone considering a path in the sciences such as theoretical physics. Physicists 101, if you will–it will introduce you hard and fast to just how difficult it will be to be notable or make a contribution in this field.

I’m not 100% convinced, as I’ve discussed in previous posts, that there isn’t a place for speculative thinking such as mine, but this is where I discovered that a deep humility and skepticism toward any new thinking is required. You *must* assume that speculation is almost certainly never going to get anywhere with journal reviewers or academic people. Nobody is going to take precious time out of their own schedule to investigate poorly thought-out ideas or even good ideas that don’t meet an extremely high standard.

So, I even presented my idea to Dr. Baez, and being the kind and tolerant man he is, he actually took the time review what I was thinking at that time–has to be 20 years ago now! Of all the work I have done, none has been as conclusive to me as the connection to special relativity–but it did not sway him. I was sure that there had to be something to it, but he only said the nature of special relativity is far reaching and he was not surprised that I found some interesting properties of closed loops in a Lorentzian context–but it didn’t prove anything to him. Oh, you can imagine how discouraged I was! I wrote an article for Physical Review Letters, but they were far nastier, and as you can imagine, that’s when my science education really began.

But I want to now to present the special relativity connection to unitary twist theory. It still feels strongly compelling to me and has, even if the theory is forever confined to the dustbin of bad ideas in history, strongly developed my instinct of what a Lorentzian geometry means to our existence.

The geometry connection of unitary twist field theory to special relativity is simple–any closed loop representation of a particle in a Lorentzian systen (ie, a geometry that observes time dilation according to the Lorentz transforms) will geometrically derive the dilation factor beta sqrt(1 – v^2/c^2). All you have to do to make this work is to assume that the loop represention of a particle consists of a twist that is propagating around the loop at speed c, and the “clock” of this particle is regulated by the time it takes to go around the loop. While this generalizes to any topological closed system of loops, knots, and links (you can see why Dr. Baez’s book interested me), let’s just examine the simple ring case. A stationary observer looking at this particle moving at some speed v will not see a ring, but rather a spiral path such that the length of a complete cycle of the spiral will unroll to a right triangle. The hypotenuse of the triangle by the Pythagorean theorem will be proportionate to the square root of v^2 + c^2, and a little simple math will show that the time to complete the cycle will dilate by the beta value defined above.

When I suddenly realized that this would *also* be true in the frame of reference of the particle observing the particles of the original observer, a light came on and I began to work out a bunch of other special relativity connections to the geometry of the unitary twist theory. I was able to prove that the dilation was the same regardless of the spatial orientation of the ring, and that it didn’t matter the shape or topology of the ring. I saw why linear twists (photons) would act differently and that rest mass would emerge from closed loops but not from linear twists. I went even as far as deriving why there has to be a speed of light limit in loops, and was able to derive the Heisenberg uncertainty for location and momentum. I even saw a way that the loop geometry would express a gravitational effect due to acceleration effects on the loop–there will be a slight resistance due to loop deformation as it is accelerated that should translate to inertia.

You can imagine my thinking that I had found a lodestone, a rich vein of ideas of how things might work! But as I tried to share my excitement, I very quickly learned what a dirty word speculation is. Eventually, I gave up trying to win a Nobel (don’t we all eventually do that, and perhaps that’s really the point when we grow up!). Now I just chug away, and if it gives somebody else some good ideas, then science has been done. That’s good enough for me now.

Agemoz

Precursor Field Forces

December 18, 2016

It looks clear now (see previous posts) that the precursor field (my underlying field proposal that is hypothesized to give rise to the particle zoo and EM and other fields) has to have a discontinuity to enable twists. This is great for quantization as mentioned in the previous post, but is really ugly for the math describing the field. Could nature really work this way? I’m dubious, but all of my analysis seems to show this is the only way, I’ve only gotten here because I have seen no other paths that appear to work.

For example, it’s obvious to everyone that an EM field can’t be the basis for quantization or solitons–lots of historical efforts that many have looked at and ruled out. Twists in a background state is a geometrical definition of quantization. Lattice and computer sim schemes are ruled out (in my mind, anyway) because I think there should be observable ether-like consequences. Adding an I direction to the R3 of our existence is necessary since twists in R3 could not provide the symmetries required for guage invariance and exchange particle combinations. The I dimension, which is merely an element pointing direction that does not lie in a physical real axis of R3, enables twist quantization, and unlike photon ring theories such as DeBroglie’s, can enable twist trajectory curvature–a necessity to allow closed loop solutions that confine particles to a finite volume. There are many more necessary constraints on this precursor field, but the most problematic is the need for field discontinuities. Any twist in a unitary orientable vector field has to be surrounded by a sheath where the twist disconnects from the background state pointing in the I direction.

Requiring discontinuities needed for enabling field twists is an ugly complication. We know already that any quantizing field theory underlying particle creation/annihilation cannot be linear since dissipation destroys particle stability–solitons cannot be formed. Almost by definition this means that the field has to have discontinuities, but mathematically describing such a field becomes very problematic. Obviously, such a field will not be differentiable since differentiability, at least finite differentiability, implies linearity.

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, the precursor field has two connections that act like forces. From these connections arise linear and curving twists, exchange bosons of fields, and so on. The first force acts only on a field element, and provides a restoring force to the background state. The second, neighboring affect force, provides an influence on immediately adjacent neighboring elements of the precursor field. The first force should not be conceptually complex–it just means that, barring any other effect, a field element vector will return to the background state.

The second force is more complex. I see at least two options how this force might work. It should be obvious this force cannot be proportionate to the dimensional rate of change of rotation because discontinuities would make this force infinite. In fact, to keep a particle from dissociating, there must be an adhesion to nearby elements–but NOT across a discontinuity. Otherwise, the force due to the discontinuity would be far greater than the force holding the elements of the twists, where each end is bound to the background state (or to the 0 and 2Pi phase rotation connection of the closed loop twist). If that happens the forces across the discontinuity would be far greater that the force tying down the twist ends to the background state and our particle, whether linear or closed loop, would immediately be shredded into nothing.

The other possibility for the second force is to make it only proportionate to the timewise rate of change of adjacent elements (sort of like induction in magnetic fields), but again, the discontinuity sheath would bring in potential infinities.  Right now this approach does not show promise at all for a bunch of reasons.

I think the only viable description of the neighborhood force would be an adhesion to nearby states who’s orientation is the same or very slightly different. That is, the angular delta from nearby elements causes a force to make that delta 0, but if there is a rip or tear then no force occurs). An important side question is whether the neighborhood connection is stronger than the restoring to I force. It’s not clear to me right now if it matters–I think field quantization works regardless of which is stronger.

This finally gives me enough description that I can mathematically encode it into a simulation. I realize that just about all of you will not accept a theory with this sort of discontinuity built into every single particle. Like you, I really am quite skeptical this is how things work. I hope you can see the logic of how I got here, the step-by-step thinking I’ve done, along with going back and seeing if I overlooked a different approach (eg, more dimensions, string theory, etc) that would be more palatable. But that hasn’t happened, I haven’t seen any other schemes that could work as well as what I have so far.

Agemoz

Nope: Precursor Field With a Background State Has to be Discontinuous

December 15, 2016

In the last post, I had come to the conclusion that the proposed R3 + I precursor field that would give rise to the particle zoo and EM and other fields could have twists and not have a discontinuity. This posed a problem, however, since quantization of a unitary twist field depends on the twist not being able to dissipate–that the discontinuity provides a “lock” that ensures particle stability over time. Further study has revealed that the extra I dimension does NOT topologically enable a continuous field that could contain twists.

The proof is simple. If the two ends of the twist are bound to the background state, but there is a field twist in between, it must be possible to create some other path connected to the endpoints that does not have a twist, since the background state must completely surround the twist path–see the diagram below. But this is impossible, because in a continuous system it must be topologically possible to move the paths close to each other such that an epsilon volume contains both paths yet has no discontinuities. Since this field is unitary and orientable (I like to use the car seat cover analogy, which is a plane of twistable balls for infinitesimal field elements), there is no “zero” magnitude possible. Somewhere in the epsilon volume there must be a region where the field orientations show a cut analogous to a contour integral cut.

It doesn’t matter how many dimensions the field has, if I’ve thought this through correctly, twists always require a discontinuity in a unitary orientable vector field.

This is a relief in most ways–otherwise this whole scheme falls apart if twists can dissipate. The only way a twist can unravel is in a collision with another twist of the opposite spin or some other similar geometrical construct.

Agemoz

twist_discontinuity_p1

Precursor Field Does Not Have to be Discontinuous

December 3, 2016

In trying to ferret out the properties of a precursor field that would give rise to the particle zoo and EM fields and so on, I had been working out just what this field would look like if it could form a loop. I have so far determined that it would have to reside in a orientable, unitary R3 + I vector field, the same dimensionality as the quantum oscillator field, and that to achieve E=hv quantization, quanta would take the form of twists in a background state pointing in the I direction. I figured out that a twist would curve in R3 if it formed a loop around a central background state region, because regardless of the loop topology in R3, it would always pass through a field orientation tilt toward the central I background region.

Up to now, the concept seemed to be workable, but I always have struggled with the field twist concept. I knew that in R3, you cannot have a field twist without a field discontinuity along the twist axis, which really caused me to doubt the veracity of the unitary twist theory. I know of no instance in the real universe where there’s a true discontinuity–even in black holes. To have our existence form from particles made of twists and field discontinuities has always seemed unlikely to the extreme–I have several times nearly abandoned this work because non-analytic fields seemed non-intuitive, non-differentiable, and non-geometrical.

However, when I tried to detail the specific mathematical possibilities for describing a curved twist in the R3 + I field, I discovered something quite surprising. Every mathematician probably knew this already–but when vector fields are described in four dimensions (R3 + I), axial twists can form in three of the four dimensions and not cause a discontinuity. The I orientation gives the field surrounding the twist an extra degree of freedom that removes the necessity for a discontinuity.

However, this does cause a different problem with the unitary twist theory. We all know that trying to form a soliton out of photons (an EM closed loop solution) is impossible because nothing can curve a photon into a ring. A big problem with trying to describe quantized photons out of EM waves is the dissipation problem, why doesn’t a quantized photon just radiate into nothing, thus losing the apparent quantization and conservation of energy? Currently, Standard Model physics doesn’t really provide an answer to that, but in unitary twist field theory work, I had determined that the discontinuities in a precursor field had acted as a lock that prevents unraveling of the particle, and thus may be necessary for particle stability. You can’t unravel a quantized twist in R3 (causing a particle loop or linear twist to disappear) because you would have to somehow resolve the discontinuity to the background state–and that definitely can’t be done in R3. But in R3 + I, there is no discontinuity required, and thus I think any twist configuration could disappear, thus potentially destroying the energy present in the particle.

So–which is it? We need R3 plus I to achieve quantization and closed loop twists–but R3 + I means we don’t have to have discontinuities–a far more realistic and likely representation of our universe via a unitary vector field, but with the disadvantage that what now enforces quantization? Are there solutions in R3 + I that still depend on a discontinuity for stability and conservation of energy?

Looks like more study and thinking is needed.

I’ll bet there’s a few scientists out there wondering if I could achieve something a lot more significant if I’d put all this time and energy into something worthwhile!

Agemoz