Posts Tagged ‘quantization’

CP Parity in the Unitary Twist Field

July 31, 2017

In the last post, I showed how the unitary twist field theory enables a schematic method of describing quark combinations, and how it resolved that protons are stable but free neutrons are not. I thought this was fascinating and proceeded to work out solutions for other quark combinations such as the neutral Kaon decay, which you will recognize as the famous particle set that led to the discovery of charge parity violation in the weak force. My hope was to discover the equivalent schematic model for the strange quark, which combined with an up or down quark gives the quark structure for Kaons. That work is underway, but thinking about CP Parity violation made me realize something uniquely important about the Unitary Twist Field Theory approach.

CP Parity violation is a leading contender for an explanation why the universe appears to have vastly more matter than antimatter. Many theories extend the standard model (in the hopes of reconciling quantum effects with gravity). Various multi-dimensional theories and string theory approaches have been proposed, but my understanding of these indicates to me that no direct physical or geometrical explanation for CP Parity violation is built in to any of these theories. I recall one physicist writing that any new theory or extension of the standard model had better have a rock-solid basis for CP Parity violation, why CP symmetry gets broken in our universe, otherwise the theory would be worthless.

The Unitary Twist Field does have CP Parity violation built in to it in a very obvious geometric way. The theory is based on a unitary directional field in R3 with orientations possible also to I that is normal to R3. To achieve geometric quantization, twists in this field have a restoring force to +I. This restoring force ensures that twists in the field either complete integer full rotations and thus are stable in time (partial twists will fall back to the background state I direction and vanish in time).

But this background state I means that this field cannot be symmetric, you cannot have particles or antiparticles that orient to -I!! Only one background state is possible, and this builds in an asymmetry to the theory. As I try to elucidate the strange quark structure from known experimental Kaon decay processes, it immediately struck me that because the I poles set a preferred handedness to the loop combinations, and that -I states are not possible if quantization of particles is to occur–this theory has to have an intrinsic handedness preference. CP Parity violation will fall out of this theory in a very obvious geometric way. If there was ever any hope of convincing a physicist to look at my approach, or actually more important, if there was any hope of truth in the unitary twist field theory, it’s the derivation of quantization of the particle zoo and the explanation for why CP Parity violation happens in quark decay sequences.

Agemoz

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Special Relativity and Unitary Twist Field Theory–Addendum

February 2, 2017

If you read my last post on the special relativity connection to this unitary twist field idea, you would be forgiven for thinking I’m still stuck in classical physics thinking, a common complaint for beginning physics students. But the importance of this revelation is more than that because it applies to *any* curve in R3–in particular, it shows that the composite paths of QFT (path integral paradigm) will behave this way as long as they are closed loops, and so will wave functions such as found in Schrodinger’s wave equation. In the latter case, even a electron model as a cloud will geometrically derive the Lorentz transforms. I believe that what this simple discovery does show is that anything that obeys special relativity must be a closed loop, even the supposedly point particle electron. Add in the quantized mass/charge of every single electron, and now you have the closed loop field twists to a background state of the unitary field twist theory that attempts to show how the particle zoo could emerge.

Agemoz

Special Relativity and Unitary Twist Theory

January 30, 2017

I’ve been working diligently on the details of how the quantizing behavior of a unitary twist vector field would form loops and other topological structures underlying a particle zoo. It has been a long time since I’ve talked about its implications for special relativity and the possibilities for deriving gravity, but it was actually the discovery of how the theory geometrically derives the time and space dilation factor that convinced me to push forward in spite of overwhelming hurdles to convincing others about the unitary twist theory approach.

In fact, I wrote to several physicists and journals because to me the special relativity connection was as close as I could come to a proof that the idea was right. But here I discovered just how hard it is to sway the scientific community, and this became my first lesson in becoming a “real” scientist. Speculative new theories occupy a tiny corner in the practical lives of scientists, I think–the reality is much reading and writing, much step-by-step incremental work, and journals are extremely resistant to accept articles that might cause embarrassment such as the cold-fusion fiasco.

Back in my formative days for physics, sci.physics was the junk physics newsgroup and sci.physics.research was the real deal, a moderated newsgroup where you could ask questions and get a number of high level academic and research scientists to respond. Dr. John Baez of UC Riverside was probably one of the more famous participants–he should be for his book “Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity”, which is one of the more accessible texts on some of the knowledge and thinking leading to thinking about gravity. But on this newsgroup he was the creator of the Crackpot Index, and this more than anything else corrected my happy over-enthusiasm for new speculative thinking. It should be required reading for anyone considering a path in the sciences such as theoretical physics. Physicists 101, if you will–it will introduce you hard and fast to just how difficult it will be to be notable or make a contribution in this field.

I’m not 100% convinced, as I’ve discussed in previous posts, that there isn’t a place for speculative thinking such as mine, but this is where I discovered that a deep humility and skepticism toward any new thinking is required. You *must* assume that speculation is almost certainly never going to get anywhere with journal reviewers or academic people. Nobody is going to take precious time out of their own schedule to investigate poorly thought-out ideas or even good ideas that don’t meet an extremely high standard.

So, I even presented my idea to Dr. Baez, and being the kind and tolerant man he is, he actually took the time review what I was thinking at that time–has to be 20 years ago now! Of all the work I have done, none has been as conclusive to me as the connection to special relativity–but it did not sway him. I was sure that there had to be something to it, but he only said the nature of special relativity is far reaching and he was not surprised that I found some interesting properties of closed loops in a Lorentzian context–but it didn’t prove anything to him. Oh, you can imagine how discouraged I was! I wrote an article for Physical Review Letters, but they were far nastier, and as you can imagine, that’s when my science education really began.

But I want to now to present the special relativity connection to unitary twist theory. It still feels strongly compelling to me and has, even if the theory is forever confined to the dustbin of bad ideas in history, strongly developed my instinct of what a Lorentzian geometry means to our existence.

The geometry connection of unitary twist field theory to special relativity is simple–any closed loop representation of a particle in a Lorentzian systen (ie, a geometry that observes time dilation according to the Lorentz transforms) will geometrically derive the dilation factor beta sqrt(1 – v^2/c^2). All you have to do to make this work is to assume that the loop represention of a particle consists of a twist that is propagating around the loop at speed c, and the “clock” of this particle is regulated by the time it takes to go around the loop. While this generalizes to any topological closed system of loops, knots, and links (you can see why Dr. Baez’s book interested me), let’s just examine the simple ring case. A stationary observer looking at this particle moving at some speed v will not see a ring, but rather a spiral path such that the length of a complete cycle of the spiral will unroll to a right triangle. The hypotenuse of the triangle by the Pythagorean theorem will be proportionate to the square root of v^2 + c^2, and a little simple math will show that the time to complete the cycle will dilate by the beta value defined above.

When I suddenly realized that this would *also* be true in the frame of reference of the particle observing the particles of the original observer, a light came on and I began to work out a bunch of other special relativity connections to the geometry of the unitary twist theory. I was able to prove that the dilation was the same regardless of the spatial orientation of the ring, and that it didn’t matter the shape or topology of the ring. I saw why linear twists (photons) would act differently and that rest mass would emerge from closed loops but not from linear twists. I went even as far as deriving why there has to be a speed of light limit in loops, and was able to derive the Heisenberg uncertainty for location and momentum. I even saw a way that the loop geometry would express a gravitational effect due to acceleration effects on the loop–there will be a slight resistance due to loop deformation as it is accelerated that should translate to inertia.

You can imagine my thinking that I had found a lodestone, a rich vein of ideas of how things might work! But as I tried to share my excitement, I very quickly learned what a dirty word speculation is. Eventually, I gave up trying to win a Nobel (don’t we all eventually do that, and perhaps that’s really the point when we grow up!). Now I just chug away, and if it gives somebody else some good ideas, then science has been done. That’s good enough for me now.

Agemoz

Precursor Field Forces

December 18, 2016

It looks clear now (see previous posts) that the precursor field (my underlying field proposal that is hypothesized to give rise to the particle zoo and EM and other fields) has to have a discontinuity to enable twists. This is great for quantization as mentioned in the previous post, but is really ugly for the math describing the field. Could nature really work this way? I’m dubious, but all of my analysis seems to show this is the only way, I’ve only gotten here because I have seen no other paths that appear to work.

For example, it’s obvious to everyone that an EM field can’t be the basis for quantization or solitons–lots of historical efforts that many have looked at and ruled out. Twists in a background state is a geometrical definition of quantization. Lattice and computer sim schemes are ruled out (in my mind, anyway) because I think there should be observable ether-like consequences. Adding an I direction to the R3 of our existence is necessary since twists in R3 could not provide the symmetries required for guage invariance and exchange particle combinations. The I dimension, which is merely an element pointing direction that does not lie in a physical real axis of R3, enables twist quantization, and unlike photon ring theories such as DeBroglie’s, can enable twist trajectory curvature–a necessity to allow closed loop solutions that confine particles to a finite volume. There are many more necessary constraints on this precursor field, but the most problematic is the need for field discontinuities. Any twist in a unitary orientable vector field has to be surrounded by a sheath where the twist disconnects from the background state pointing in the I direction.

Requiring discontinuities needed for enabling field twists is an ugly complication. We know already that any quantizing field theory underlying particle creation/annihilation cannot be linear since dissipation destroys particle stability–solitons cannot be formed. Almost by definition this means that the field has to have discontinuities, but mathematically describing such a field becomes very problematic. Obviously, such a field will not be differentiable since differentiability, at least finite differentiability, implies linearity.

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, the precursor field has two connections that act like forces. From these connections arise linear and curving twists, exchange bosons of fields, and so on. The first force acts only on a field element, and provides a restoring force to the background state. The second, neighboring affect force, provides an influence on immediately adjacent neighboring elements of the precursor field. The first force should not be conceptually complex–it just means that, barring any other effect, a field element vector will return to the background state.

The second force is more complex. I see at least two options how this force might work. It should be obvious this force cannot be proportionate to the dimensional rate of change of rotation because discontinuities would make this force infinite. In fact, to keep a particle from dissociating, there must be an adhesion to nearby elements–but NOT across a discontinuity. Otherwise, the force due to the discontinuity would be far greater than the force holding the elements of the twists, where each end is bound to the background state (or to the 0 and 2Pi phase rotation connection of the closed loop twist). If that happens the forces across the discontinuity would be far greater that the force tying down the twist ends to the background state and our particle, whether linear or closed loop, would immediately be shredded into nothing.

The other possibility for the second force is to make it only proportionate to the timewise rate of change of adjacent elements (sort of like induction in magnetic fields), but again, the discontinuity sheath would bring in potential infinities.  Right now this approach does not show promise at all for a bunch of reasons.

I think the only viable description of the neighborhood force would be an adhesion to nearby states who’s orientation is the same or very slightly different. That is, the angular delta from nearby elements causes a force to make that delta 0, but if there is a rip or tear then no force occurs). An important side question is whether the neighborhood connection is stronger than the restoring to I force. It’s not clear to me right now if it matters–I think field quantization works regardless of which is stronger.

This finally gives me enough description that I can mathematically encode it into a simulation. I realize that just about all of you will not accept a theory with this sort of discontinuity built into every single particle. Like you, I really am quite skeptical this is how things work. I hope you can see the logic of how I got here, the step-by-step thinking I’ve done, along with going back and seeing if I overlooked a different approach (eg, more dimensions, string theory, etc) that would be more palatable. But that hasn’t happened, I haven’t seen any other schemes that could work as well as what I have so far.

Agemoz

Nope: Precursor Field With a Background State Has to be Discontinuous

December 15, 2016

In the last post, I had come to the conclusion that the proposed R3 + I precursor field that would give rise to the particle zoo and EM and other fields could have twists and not have a discontinuity. This posed a problem, however, since quantization of a unitary twist field depends on the twist not being able to dissipate–that the discontinuity provides a “lock” that ensures particle stability over time. Further study has revealed that the extra I dimension does NOT topologically enable a continuous field that could contain twists.

The proof is simple. If the two ends of the twist are bound to the background state, but there is a field twist in between, it must be possible to create some other path connected to the endpoints that does not have a twist, since the background state must completely surround the twist path–see the diagram below. But this is impossible, because in a continuous system it must be topologically possible to move the paths close to each other such that an epsilon volume contains both paths yet has no discontinuities. Since this field is unitary and orientable (I like to use the car seat cover analogy, which is a plane of twistable balls for infinitesimal field elements), there is no “zero” magnitude possible. Somewhere in the epsilon volume there must be a region where the field orientations show a cut analogous to a contour integral cut.

It doesn’t matter how many dimensions the field has, if I’ve thought this through correctly, twists always require a discontinuity in a unitary orientable vector field.

This is a relief in most ways–otherwise this whole scheme falls apart if twists can dissipate. The only way a twist can unravel is in a collision with another twist of the opposite spin or some other similar geometrical construct.

Agemoz

twist_discontinuity_p1

Precursor Field Does Not Have to be Discontinuous

December 3, 2016

In trying to ferret out the properties of a precursor field that would give rise to the particle zoo and EM fields and so on, I had been working out just what this field would look like if it could form a loop. I have so far determined that it would have to reside in a orientable, unitary R3 + I vector field, the same dimensionality as the quantum oscillator field, and that to achieve E=hv quantization, quanta would take the form of twists in a background state pointing in the I direction. I figured out that a twist would curve in R3 if it formed a loop around a central background state region, because regardless of the loop topology in R3, it would always pass through a field orientation tilt toward the central I background region.

Up to now, the concept seemed to be workable, but I always have struggled with the field twist concept. I knew that in R3, you cannot have a field twist without a field discontinuity along the twist axis, which really caused me to doubt the veracity of the unitary twist theory. I know of no instance in the real universe where there’s a true discontinuity–even in black holes. To have our existence form from particles made of twists and field discontinuities has always seemed unlikely to the extreme–I have several times nearly abandoned this work because non-analytic fields seemed non-intuitive, non-differentiable, and non-geometrical.

However, when I tried to detail the specific mathematical possibilities for describing a curved twist in the R3 + I field, I discovered something quite surprising. Every mathematician probably knew this already–but when vector fields are described in four dimensions (R3 + I), axial twists can form in three of the four dimensions and not cause a discontinuity. The I orientation gives the field surrounding the twist an extra degree of freedom that removes the necessity for a discontinuity.

However, this does cause a different problem with the unitary twist theory. We all know that trying to form a soliton out of photons (an EM closed loop solution) is impossible because nothing can curve a photon into a ring. A big problem with trying to describe quantized photons out of EM waves is the dissipation problem, why doesn’t a quantized photon just radiate into nothing, thus losing the apparent quantization and conservation of energy? Currently, Standard Model physics doesn’t really provide an answer to that, but in unitary twist field theory work, I had determined that the discontinuities in a precursor field had acted as a lock that prevents unraveling of the particle, and thus may be necessary for particle stability. You can’t unravel a quantized twist in R3 (causing a particle loop or linear twist to disappear) because you would have to somehow resolve the discontinuity to the background state–and that definitely can’t be done in R3. But in R3 + I, there is no discontinuity required, and thus I think any twist configuration could disappear, thus potentially destroying the energy present in the particle.

So–which is it? We need R3 plus I to achieve quantization and closed loop twists–but R3 + I means we don’t have to have discontinuities–a far more realistic and likely representation of our universe via a unitary vector field, but with the disadvantage that what now enforces quantization? Are there solutions in R3 + I that still depend on a discontinuity for stability and conservation of energy?

Looks like more study and thinking is needed.

I’ll bet there’s a few scientists out there wondering if I could achieve something a lot more significant if I’d put all this time and energy into something worthwhile!

Agemoz

A Promising Precursor Field Geometry

November 29, 2016

I’ve been trying to find a geometrical description of how a unitary field twist could curve. If my hypothesis for the particle zoo arising from a precursor field is correct, the precursor field has to have a number of constraints. I’ve described what I know so far in depth in previous posts–here’s a summary of some of the basic requirements:
a: The precursor field cannot be an EM field with some sort of quantization added to it. The precursor field has to give rise to EM fields (and particles) but it has to be a continuous vector field with no magnitude (orientable only).
b: This field resides in R3 + I (same as the quantum oscillator spacetime) where quantization is achieved via twists that return to a background state pointing in the I direction.
c: There must be two connections built into the precursor field–a restoring force to I, and some kind of angular momentum transfer to neighboring field elements. This transfer force cannot be physical, otherwise field twists would not be possible since twists require a field discontinuity.
d: Field twists can be linear (eg photons) or confined to a finite space in the form of loops or knots or linked combinations of both.
e: There must be some means for a twist propagation to curve (otherwise the loop twists are not possible. I have investigated in detail various mechanisms within the R3 + I space, and believe I see a possibility enabled by the restoring force to the I dimension orientation.

The huge overwhelming problem with this hypothesis is that we appear to have zero evidence for such a precursor field or a background state or the two force connections I’ve described, the restoring force and the neighborhood connection force. I trudged forward with this anyway, knowing no-one out there would give this concept a second’s thought. I searched for possibilities in R3 + I where a loop twist could form and be stable, and for quite a while couldn’t find anything that made any sense.

I’ll tell you, I almost threw in the towel thinking this is a stupid quest. No evidence for a precursor field, no self-sustaining loop geometries that I could see, and experimental physics says any loop solution has to be too small to measure–a basic monkey-wrench in the whole unitary twist idea. I thought a lot, I’m just a dumb crackpot that doesn’t even have it wrong.

Yet something in the back of my mind says to me–when you look at the big picture, the particle zoo has to have a reductionist solution. For this existence to arise from nothing, there has to be some kind of field that gives rise to stable clumps we know as particles. For reasons I’ve discussed in previous posts, this can’t be some sort of computer simulation, nor can there be a creating entity. This all has to arise from nothing, I think–and from a deductive perspective, to me that means a single field must underlie particle formation. I’ve been able to come up with a number of constraints that this field has to have. I keep coming back to not seeing evidence for it, so I feel like I’m wandering around in a sea of ideas with no ability to confirm or deny any intermediate details of how things work. I see no realistic possibility that I could convince somebody this would work, I can’t even convince myself of that. Yet–there has got to be something. I have faith that Humanity can’t have reached the limit of understanding already!!

Not knowing what else to do other than abandon ship, I looked at R3 + I twist solutions, just about all of which couldn’t possibly work. Most fail because of symmetry issues or fail to provide an environment where twists could curve or be self-sustaining, regardless of how I describe the precursor field forces. Just yesterday, however, I happened upon a solution that has some promise. As discussed in previous posts, the restoring force to I is an enabler for quantization, but I realized it’s also an enabler for altering the path of a twist. I used the example in a previous post of how a field twist in R3 will curve if a regional part of the field is tilted in another dimension (imagine propagating a falling dominoe sequence through a sea of dominoes that is already partway orthogonally tilted). I am still checking this out, but it looks like there is one way to form the twist where this happens–if the twist loop resides in two of the dimensions of R3, and the axial twist in that loop resides in the remaining R3 dimension, but the restoring force is to the I dimension direction, the center of the loop will hold an element pointing in the I direction, thus causing all of the surrounding elements including the twist loop itself to feel a swirly (ref the Calvin and Hobbes cartoon!) that causes the twist propagation to pass through the field that is curved toward the center of the R3 loop.

This concept is ridiculously difficult to visualize, but essentially the I restoring force causes the field to always twist toward the center, regardless of loop orientation within R3. This is what the unitary twist field has to have–any other dimensional geometry simply does not provide the necessary twist curve. Believe me, I tried all other combinations–this is the only one that seems to consistently work no matter what kind of a topological loop configuration is used. Here is a pathetic attempt to draw out what I am thinking…

Agemoz

twist_in_restoring_i

Precursor Field Connection to Quantum Field Theory

November 8, 2016

I’ve done some pretty intense thinking about the precursor field that enables quantized particles to exist (see prior post for a summary of this thought process) via unitary field twists that tend to a background state direction. This field would have to have two types of connections that act like forces in conventional physics: a restoring force to the background direction, and a connecting force to neighborhood field elements. The first force is pretty simple to describe mathematically, although some questions remain about metastability and other issues that I’ll mention in a later post. The second force is the important one. My previous post described several properties for this connection, such as the requirement that the field connection can only affect immediate neighborhood field elements.

The subject that really got me thinking was specifically how one field element influences others. As I mentioned, the effect can’t pass through neighboring elements. It can’t be a physical connection, what I mean by that is you can’t model the connection with some sort of rubber band, otherwise twists could not be possible since twists require a field discontinuity along the twist axis. That means the connection has to act via a form of momentum transfer. An important basis for a field twist has to consist of an element rotation, since no magnitudes exist for field elements (this comes from E=hv quantization, see previous few posts). But just how would this rotation, or change in rotation speed, affect neighboring elements? Would it affect a region or neighborhood, or only one other element? And by how much–would the propagation axis get more of the rotation energy, if so, how much energy do other non-axial regions get, and if there are multiple twists, what is the combined effect? How do you ensure that twist energy is conserved? You can see that trying to describe the second force precisely opens up a huge can of worms

To conserve twist energy so the twist doesn’t dissipate or somehow get amplified in R3, I thought the only obvious possibility is that an element rotation or change of rotation speed would only affect one field element in the direction of propagation. But I realized that if this field is going to underlie the particle/field interactions described by quantum mechanics and quantum field theory, the energy of the twist has to spread to many adjacent field elements in order to describe, for example, quantum interference. I really struggled after realizing that–how is twist conservation going to be enforced if there is a distributed element rotation impact.

Then I had what might be called (chutzpah trigger warning coming 🙂 a breakthrough. I don’t have to figure that out. It’s already described in quantum theory by path integrals–the summation of all possible paths, most of which will cancel out. Quantum Field theory describes how particles interact with an EM field, for example, via the summation of all possible virtual and real particle paths via exchange bosons, for instance, photons. Since quantum field theory describes every interaction as a sum of all possible exchange bosons, and does it while conserving various interaction properties, all this stuff I’m working on could perhaps be simply described as replacing both real and virtual particles of quantum theory with field twists, partial or complete, that tend to rotate to the I dimension direction in R3 + I space (the same space described with the quantum oscillator model) of my twist theory hypothesis.

I now have to continue to process and think about this revelation–can all this thinking I’ve been doing be reduced to nothing more than a different way to think about the particles of quantum field theory? Do I add any value to quantum field theory by looking at it this way? Is there even remotely a possibility of coming up with an experiment to verify this idea?

Agemoz

Precursor Field Continuing Work

October 28, 2016

I suspect that groundbreaking work in any field which involves the old saw of 5% inspiration, 95% sweat applies to what I’m doing with the precursor field. It may be a rather big chunk of chutzpah to call my work “groundbreaking”, but it’s definitely creative, and is definitely in the “tedious work out the details” phase. To summarize what I am describing here, I have invented an area of study which I’ve encapsulated with a concept name of the “precursor field”. As discussed in many previous posts, the one-line description of this area of study is “If a single field could bring forth the particle zoo, what would it look like”. For the last bunch of posts, I’ve been working out an acceptable list of assumptions and constraints for this field. Not very exciting, but I’m trying to be thorough and make reasonable conclusions as I work step by step on this. Ultimately I want to derive the math for this field and create a sim or analysis to verify that stable particles resembling the particle zoo will emerge.

Up to now, as discussed in many previous posts, I’ve been able to show that the precursor field cannot be derived from an EM field like DeBroglie and others have done, they failed to come up with a workable solution to enable emergence of stable quantized particles. Thus, there has to be a precursor field from which EM field behavior emerges. I’ve been able to determine that the dimensions of this precursor field has to encompass R3 + I as well as the time dimension. The field must be orientable without magnitude variation, so a thinking model of this field would be a volume of tiny weighted balls. Quantum mechanics theory, in particular, non-causal interference and entanglement, force the precursor field to Fourier decompose to waves that have infinite propagation speed, but particles other than massless bosons must form as group wave clusters. These will move causally because motion results from the rate of phase change of the group wave components, and this rate of phase change is limited (for as yet unknown reasons). The precursor field must allow emergence of quantization of energy by having two connections between field elements–a restoring force to I, and a neighborhood connection to R3. The restoring force causes quantized particles to emerge by only allowing full rotation twists of the precursor field. The neighborhood force would enable group wave confinement to a ring or other topological structures confined to a finite volume, thus causing inertial mass to emerge from a twist in the field.

I’ve left out other derived details, but that should give you a sense of the precursor field analysis I’ve been doing. Lately, I’ve come up with more conclusions. As I said at the beginning–this is kind of tedious at this point, but needs to be thought through as carefully as possible, otherwise the foundation of this attempt to find the precursor field structure could veer wildly off course. I’m reminded of doing a difficult Sudoku puzzle–one minor mistake or assumption early on in the derivation of a solution means that a lot of pointless work will follow that can only, near the end of the puzzle derivation, result in a visible trainwreck. I would really like for my efforts to actually point somewhere in the right direction, so you will see me try to be painstakingly thorough. Even then, I suspect I could be wildly wrong, but it won’t be because I rushed through and took conceptual shortcuts.

OK, let me now point out some new conclusions I’ve recently uncovered about the precursor field.

An essential question is whether the precursor field is continuous or is somehow composed of finite chunks. I realized that the field itself cannot exist in any quantized form–it must be continuous in R3 + I. Thus my previously stated model of a volume of balls is not really accurate unless you assume the balls are infinitely small. I make this conclusion because it appears clear that any field quantization would show up in some variation of a Michelson-Morley experiment, there would be evidence of an ether–and we have no such evidence. I thought maybe the field quantization could be chaotic, e.g, elements are random sized–but then I think the conservation of momentum and charge could not strictly hold throughout the universe. So, the precursor field is continuous, not quantum–thus making the argument that the universe is a computer simulation improbable.

The necessity for twists to allow quantized stable particle formation from a continuous field means that this field is not necessarily differentiable (that is, adjacent infinitesimals may have a finite, non infinitesimal difference in orientation). Quantization has to emerge from the restoring force, but cannot pre-exist in the precursor field.

I realized that the emergence of twists within a volume (necessary to form stable solitons) puts a number of constraints on the connecting force (one of the two connections necessary for the precursor field). First, the connection cannot be physical, otherwise twists cannot exist in this field–twists require a discontinuity region along the axis of the twist. Thus, the connection force must work by momentum transfer rather than direct connection. Another way to put it is there cannot be “rubber bands” between each infinitesimal element. Momentum transfer doesn’t prohibit discontinuities in field orientation, but a physical direct connection would.

Secondly, the neighborhood connection can only work on adjacent infinitesimals. This is different than an EM field, where a single point charge affects both neighborhood and distant regions. EM forces pass through adjacent elements to affect distant elements, but the precursor neighborhood force can’t do that without presupposing another independent field. This discovery was a very nice one because it means the field math is going to be a whole lot easier to work with.

Third, the precursor field must be able to break up a momentum transfer resulting from a neighborhood force. It must be possible that if the action of one infinitesimal induces a neighborhood connection, it must be possible to induce this connection force to more than one neighboring infinitesimal, otherwise the only possible group wave construction would be linear twists (photons). A receiving infinitesimal could get partial twist momenta from more than one adjacent infinitesimal, thus the propagation path of a twist could be influenced by multiple neighbors in such a way to induce a non-linear path such as a ring.

Lastly (for now, anyway!) the restoring force means that sums of momentum transfers must be quantized when applied to another field infinitesimal. I realized it’s possible that a given infinitesimal could get a momentum transfer sum greater than that induced by a single twist. In order for particle energy conservation to work, among many other things, there must be a mechanism for chopping off excess momentum transfer and the restoring connection force provides this. The excess momentum transfer disappears if the sum is not enough to induce a second rotation. I can see from simple geometry that the result will always be a single path, it’s not possible for two twists to suddenly emerge from one. I think if you study this, you will realize this is true, but I can’t do that subject justice here right now. I’ll think about a clear way to describe this in a following post, especially since this work will set the groundwork for the field math.

I’ve come up with more, but this is a good point to stop here for now. You can go back to more interesting silly cat videos now 🙂

Agemoz

Precursor Field and Renormalization

September 25, 2016

As I work out the details of the Precursor Field, I need to explain how this proposal deals with renormalization issues. The Precursor Field attempts to explain why we have a particle zoo, quantization, and quantum entanglement–and has to allow the emergence of force exchange particles for at least the EM and Strong forces. Previous efforts by physics theorists attempted to extend the EM field properties so that quantization could be derived, but these efforts have all failed. It’s my belief that there has to be an underlying “precursor” field that allows stable quantized particles and force exchange particles to form. I’ve been working out what properties this field must have, and one thing has been strikingly apparent–starting with an EM field and extending it cannot possibly work for a whole host of reasons.

As mentioned extensively in previous posts, the fundamental geometry of this precursor field is an orientable 3D+I dimensional vector field. It cannot have magnitude (otherwise E-hv quantization would not be constrained), must allow vector twists (and thus is not finite differentiable ie, not continuous) and must have a preferred orientation in the I direction to force an integral number of twists. Previous posts on this site eke out more properties this field must have, but lately I’ve been focusing on the renormalization problem. There are two connections at play in the proposed precursor field–the twist quantization force, which provides a low-energy state in the I direction, and a twist propagation force. The latter is an element neighborhood force, that is, is the means by which an element interacts with its neighbors.

The problem with any neighborhood force is that any linear interaction will dissipate in strength in a 3D space according to the central force model, and thus mathematically is proportionate to 1/r^2. Any such force will run into infinities that make finding realistic solutions impossible. Traditional quantum field theory works around this successfully by invoking cancelling infinities, renormalizing the computation into a finite range of solutions. This works, but the precursor field has to address infinities more directly. Or perhaps I should say it should. The cool thing is that I discovered it does. Not only that, but the precursor field provides a clean path from the quantized unitary twist model to the emergence of magnetic and electrostatic forces in quantum field theory. This discovery came from the fact that closed loop twists have two sources of twists.

The historical efforts to extend and quantize the EM field is exemplified by the DeBroglie EM wave around a closed loop. The problem here, of course, is that photons (the EM wave component) don’t bend like this, nor does this approach provide a quantization of particle mass. Such a model, if it could produce a particle with a confined momentum of an EM wave, would have no constraint on making a slightly smaller particle with a slightly higher EM wave frequency. Worse, the force that bends the wave would have the renormalization problem–the electrostatic balancing force is a central force proportionate function, and thus has a pole (infinity) at zero radius. This is the final nail in the coffin of trying to use an EM field to form a basis for quantizing particles.
The unitary twist field doesn’t have this problem, because the forces that bend the twist are not central force proportionate. The best way to describe the twist neighborhood connection is as a magnetic flux model. In addition, there are *two* twists in a unitary twist field particle (closed loop of various topologies). There is the quantized vector twist from I to R3 and back again to I, that is, a twist about the propagation axis. And, there is also the twist that results from propagating around the closed loop. Similar to magnetic fields, the curving (normal) force on a twist element is proportionate to the cross-product of the flux change with the twist element propagation direction. My basic calculations show there is a class of closed loop topologies where the two forces cancel each other along a LaGrangian minimum energy path, thus providing a quantized set of solutions (particles). It should be obvious that neither connection force is central force dependent and thus the  renormalization problem disappears.  There should be a large or infinite number of solutions, and the current quest is to see if these solutions match or resemble the particle zoo.

In summary, this latest work shows that the behavior of the precursor field has to be such that central force connections cannot be allowed (and thus forever eliminates the possibility that an EM field can be extended to enable quantization). It also shows how true quantization of particle mass can be achieved, and finally shows how an electrostatic field must emerge given that central force interactions cannot exist at the precursor field level. EM fields must emerge as the result of force exchange particles because it cannot emerge from any central force field, thus validating quantum field theory from a geometrical basis!

I thought that was pretty cool… But I must confess to a certain angst.

Is anybody going to care about these ideas? I know the answer is no. I imagine Feynman (or worse, Bohr) looking over my shoulder and (perhaps kindly or not) saying what the heck are you wasting your time for. Go study real physics that produces real results. This speculative crap isn’t worth the time of day. Why do I bother! I know that extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof–extraordinary in either experimental verification or deductive proof. Neither option, as far as I have been able to think, is within my reach. But until I can produce something, these ideas amount to absolutely nothing.

I suppose one positive outcome is personal–I’ve learned a lot and entertained myself plus perhaps a few readers on the possibility of how things might work. I’ve passed time contemplating the universe, which I think is unarguably a better way to spend a human life than watching the latest garbage on youtube or TV. Maybe I’ve spurred one person out there to think about our existence in a different way.

Or, perhaps more pessimistically, I’m just a crackpot. The lesson of the Man of La Mancha is about truly understanding just who and what you are, and reaching for the impossible star can doing something important to your character. I like the image that perhaps I’m an explorer of human existence, even if perhaps not a very good one–and willing to share my adventures with any of you who choose to follow along.

Agemoz